“It’s not even that slippery!” I said to my girls as we descended the canyon road the other day. 

Famous last words.

200 yards down the road, going 20mph, the road turned icy and I got stuck in a tractor tire rut which had an icy lip in the middle.

I knew I was going to hit the lip. 

I knew I was going to crash.

One…last…effort…

OOOOOOOUUUUUUUUCCCCCCCHHHHHHHH!!!

I slid 40 feet on rough ice and asphalt. 

When my daughter pulled up her first words were “Wait…don’t move, I need a picture!”

She learned those words from me rolling up on her crashes over the years.

It hurts.  

I have a massive bruise on my left hip. 

You can prevent the pain of hiring and losing a good VA when you hire them by understanding that they’re scared to start working for you.

They’re scared they’re not going to understand you.
They’re scared they’re not going to do good work for you.
They’re scared you’re not going to be happy with their work.

They probably won’t do great work for you until they begin to trust you.

You can start gaining their trust by
1. providing them training
2. giving them feedback.

When I do this on the very first task with someone I like to give them the training with the instruction to go through the training and to summarize what I want them to do.
I don’t actually ask them to do the task!

I want to give them a way to give me feedback on my training.  
If what they tell me is exactly what I want them to do, GREAT! I ask them to get started.

But if what they tell me is different than what I want them to do, I go back and redo my training.

It’s an easy way to help them ensure that you’re going to be happy with their work before they even start doing the work.

It builds trust.
It prevents problems.
It keeps you from crashing with your new VA.

John